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ASIAdocument.write(“” + m[today.getMonth()+1]+ ” “+ today.getDate()+”, ” + theYear + ” “);HOMECHINAWORLDBUSINESSLIFESTYLECULTURETRAVELSPORTSOPINIONREGIONALFORUMNEWSPAPERChina Daily PDFChina Daily E-paperChina Daily Global PDFChina Daily Global E-paperOpinion / Op-Ed ContributorsEditorialsOp-EdColumnistsContributorsCartoonsSpecialsFrom the PressForum TrendsTalk from streetDebateEditors Pick:Syrian refugeescyberspaceV-Day paradeshrimp scandalTPPUS should not politicize InternetBy Liu Quan (China Daily) Updated:2015-11-19 08:26Comments Print Mail Large Medium SmallPeople pose in front of a display showing the word cyber in binary code, in this picture illustration taken in Zenica December 27, 2014. [Photo/Agencies]Security and other issues related to cyberspace have increasingly affected international relations, leading to a war of words among some major world powers. Openness and freedom are the two basic features of the Internet, through which information freely flows from one person to another and from one country to another, and that is why “freedom” is said to be the founding stone of cyberspace.But this freedom cannot be limitless and should not challenge the normal order of cyberspace. As Lu Wei, minister of the Cyberspace Administration of China, once said, freedom is the purpose while order serves to protect it. Freedom and regulation are not mutually contradictory. Instead, they are two sides of the same coin.Besides, since cyberspace, despite being called the virtual world, is intimately connected with the real world, chaos in the former can lead to disastrous consequences in the latter. The riots that rocked London, Birmingham and several other cities in the United Kingdom in 2011 after the death of a black UK citizen and flared up thanks to social networks are a good example of how lack of order in the virtual world can cause mayhem in the real world.To prevent such tragedies from happening and since all freedoms come with responsibilities and limits, most countries have enacted laws to regulate cyberspace. But some countries, to fulfill their narrow interests, try to politicize the laws that other countries have implemented as a safeguard against the bedlam the misuse of cyberspace could unleash on society.Previous Page1 2 Next PagePrevious Page1 2 Next Page0Related StoriesUS should give up its hegemony in cyberspaceGovernment revs up cyberspace rulesWilling to cooperate on cyberspaceXi urges constructive cyberspace talksChina proposes deeper cyberspace cooperation with ASEANMost Viewed Todays Top NewsHousing booms may hurt, not heal, local growthTime to break free of protectionist shacklesAllow space for students to discover themselvesPhilippines arbitration case built on false pretextFunding global public goods for worlds recoveryForum TrendsTips to manage stress when studying abroadWhy are Chinese students heading to the US?Should investment lessons be mandatory?How can doctors and patients regain trust?Are women-only buses discriminatory?Do student evaluations measure teaching effectiveness?What annoys you most while traveling in China?ColumnistsTrumps willingness to talk to the DPRK is the right approachFestival drama peels layers of character who isnt thereFeatured ContributorsTurnball highlights China-Australia FTA as a valuable assetBloody curtain rising to greet US first-ever presidentStar BloggersMy best friend in China: 35th anniversary of China Daily By subeChina Daily is like a friend who stays with me in every mood in my life. If I am happy, I can write a blog and if I am upset, I can enjoy what others have said and let my feelings go away.China Daily, 35 years on: my memories By aixiI first discovered China Daily a few years ago. It was my first visit to China, and I was waiting for my tour guide to arrive.My vision for a smog-free China By eddieturksonI’ve lived in China for quite a considerable time including my graduate school years, travelled and worked in a few cities and still choose my destination taking into consideration the density of smog or PM2.5 particulate matter in the region.SpecialChina Daily, 35 years on: your memoriesPositive energy Leifeng laowai story2016 Happy Chinese New Year…| About China Daily | Advertise on Site | Contact Us | Job Offer | Expat Employment |Copyright 1995 -var oTime = new Date();
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